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Miniatures

Five hundred years ago, when there were no cameras, the Mughals captured life in paintings. They brought the miniature style of painting to India with artists from Persia. Each kingdom developed its own style with difference and similarities between them. Several schools such as Mewar, Bundi, Kotah, Marwar, Bikaner, Jaipur, and Kishangarh, flourished under the patronage of the Mughal kings. Mughal miniatures started as records of the lives of the emperors and eventually captured courtly life and tales from the Hindu epics also. This art form was also used to ornament the walls and ceilings of temples, forts and palaces lending a special beauty to the monuments of Rajasthan.

At the time of the Moghuls, many artists worked together in a Karkhana. Each artist contributing a special skill, like drawing hands, faces or just the animals and filling in the background. It was for this reason that the paintings were not signed, as they belonged to a group or school of artists. Miniature painters usually sat on the ground while working, with one knee flexed to support a drawing board. Their technique was simple, using opaque water colors on handmade paper.

Artists learned the secrets of making colors from their fathers or uncles, as the craft was frequently a family occupation. As children, they were taught how to make balanced finger-fitting paintbrushes of birds quills, set with fine hairs plucked from kittens or baby squirrels. They also learnt how to grind mineral pigments, such as, green and blue, in a mortar, how to sort them grain by grain for acquiring purity and brilliance and how to prepare the aqueous binding medium of a glue.

Other pigments were made from earth, insects and animal matter and metals. To make metallic pigments, gold, silver and copper were pounded into foil between sheets of leather, after which the foil was ground with rough salt in a mortar. The salt was then washed out leaving behind the pure metal powder. This technique and process is still used by contemporary artists.

The paintings were created with bold clean lines, vibrant colors and fine, rich detailing of ornaments, drapery, courtly finery, flora and fauna. From the Mughal era, the paintings eventually passed to the Rajput rulers and eventually became a part of the very fabric of India. The various schools of Mughal miniature painting continue to this day. Even now, entire groups or communities of artists work together to create these storied masterpieces on ivory, silk, cotton and paper.
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Rs. 2,500.00

Artist: Kailshchand Kumavat  Genre: Miniature Size: 13"x8.5" (inches) Medium: Natural stone colour and use of real gold work on stamp paper A regal horse prepares to gallop across this 106-year-old stamp paper canvas. Painted with natural pigments and real gold, it is a beautiful addition to any home.

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Rs. 1,000.00

Artist: Mohan Kumar Prajapati Genre: Miniature Size: 6.5"x6.5" (inches) Medium: Natural stone colour and use of real gold work on hand made paper A lace like, richly adorned border frames a horse with military bearing, in this miniature. Real gold and mineral pigments have been used on this canvas to create a textured and beautiful painting.

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Rs. 1,000.00

Artist: Mohan Kumar Prajapati Genre: Miniature Size: 6.5"x6.5" (inches) Medium: Natural stone colour and use of real gold work on hand made paper A gold-decked elephant marches forth, framed by an intricately detailed border. This lovely Mughal miniature has been painted with natural pigments and real gold

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Artist: Kailshchand Kumavat  Genre: Miniature Size: 13"x8.5" (inches) Medium: Natural stone colour and use of real gold work on stamp paper A queen journeys on a bedecked elephant in this vividly hued Mughal miniature. Painted on a 106-year-old stamp paper with natural pigments and real gold, it is a piece worth treasuring.

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Rs. 2,500.00

Artist: Kailshchand Kumavat  Genre: Mughal Miniature Size: 6"x6" (inches) Medium: Natural stone colour and use of real gold work on hand made paper A Mughal king finds repose in his harem in this beautiful miniature. Painted with natural pigments and real gold on 106-year-old stamp paper, it a piece of treasured memory.

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Rs. 2,500.00

Artist: Kailshchand Kumavat  Genre: Mughal Miniature Size: 6"x6" (inches) Medium: Natural stone colour and use of real gold work on hand made paper A king reposes in his harem for an evening of music and love, in this beautiful Mughal miniature. Painted on a 106-year-old stamp paper with mineral pigments and gold, it offers a delectable juxtaposition of a modern rendering on...

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Rs. 950.00

Material: Marble Framed This is a beautiful necklace work of meenakari on marble.

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Rs. 950.00

Material: Marble Framed This is a beautiful necklace work of meenakari on marble.